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City Palate Recipe: Apricots Soaked in Brandy with Green Peppercorns Wrapped in Pancetta

Appetizers, Starters and Breakfasts

Orange Marmalade

Orange Marmalade

Orange Marmalade

Jan/Feb 2012

Make this marmalade using Seville oranges, or whatever oranges you can get your hands on – even a combination. Blood oranges make a beautifully coloured marmalade. The orange seeds are simmered with the marmalade because they contain pectin.

4 large, thin-skinned oranges (you’ll need
6 cups of chopped orange)

5 c. water

pinch salt

4 c. sugar

Cut the oranges in half and poke the seeds out; put them into a tea ball if you have one, or wrap them in cheesecloth. Slice the oranges thinly and then chop them crosswise into as big or small pieces as you like. Put the orange pieces and the tea ball into a pot with the water and salt and bring the water to a boil; simmer for half an hour. Turn off the heat and let the oranges sit for a few hours or overnight.

When you’re ready to make the marmalade, stir the sugar into the chopped oranges and bring the mixture to a boil. Cook it for about half an hour, or until the marmalade gels – you can test it by dropping a small spoonful onto a saucer that you kept in the freezer while the marmalade simmered. If the marmalade wrinkles and doesn’t run together after you run your finger through it, it’s a good gel consistency. When the marmalade is the consistency you like, remove it from the heat. Pull out the tea ball of orange seeds, pour the marmalade into clean, warm jars, and seal them according to the manufacturer’s instructions. Or you can cool the marmalade completely and store it in the fridge or freezer. Makes about 4 cups.