City Palate

The Wine & Beer Issue - May June 2017

Turkish Spoon Salad
Turkish Spoon Salad.html

Turkish Spoon Salad

March/April issue

From Matthew Altizer

This is really more of a bruschetta than a salad, and it’s so saucy it’s best eaten with a spoon, hence the name. Serve this salad as part of a meze (appetizer) assortment with flatbread or with grilled meats. It’s important to make sure that all of the vegetables are very ripe and finely diced.

5 large ripe tomatoes, finely chopped

4 large shallots, very finely chopped

2 red peppers and 1 green pepper, seeds and ribs removed, finely chopped

1/2 bunch Italian parsley, finely chopped

1 t. dried mint*

1/2 t. Marash chile flakes*

juice of one lemon

kosher salt to taste

1 t. pomegranate molasses

1 t. honey

2 T. best quality olive oil

Combine all of the ingredients except for 1 tablespoon of the olive oil. Mix well and taste for seasoning. The salad should be intensely flavoured but well balanced. Spread the salad into a shallow serving dish and drizzle with the remaining olive oil. The salad can be made up to one day ahead of time. Serve cold or at room temperature. Serves 4 to 6 as an appetizer.

*Dried mint: You may be wondering why dried mint is called for in this recipe, instead of fresh. It's all about the flavour profile. The Turks take their dried herbs just as seriously as their fresh herbs. And in this recipe, it is the dried version of mint that you want.

*Marash chile flakes are from Turkey. They’re a touch milder than the grocery store variety. Find them at Silk Road Spice Merchant.


Vegetables and Salads